Health Made Simple

Colorectal Cancer

March 16, 2020 KNOWME
Health Made Simple
Colorectal Cancer
Chapters
Health Made Simple
Colorectal Cancer
Mar 16, 2020
KNOWME

If you are 45 or older, pay attention!  It’s time for you to be screened for colon and rectal cancer.  

Colon cancer is when abnormal cells in the colon or rectum divide uncontrollably, ultimately forming a cancerous or malignant tumor. (The colon and rectum are parts of the body’s digestive system, which takes up nutrients from food and water and stores solid waste until it passes out of the body.

Colorectal cancer is very common.  In fact, it’s the third most common type of cancer in both men (after prostate cancer and lung cancer) and women (after breast cancer and lung cancer). 

While it’s the 3rd most common cancer, it is the second deadliest behind ung cancer. 

An estimated 130,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year, and approximately 50,000 will die from it.

The major risk factors for colorectal cancer are a family history of the disease and older age, but several other factors have been associated with increased risk, including excessive alcohol use, obesity, being physically inactive, cigarette smoking.

I’ve made it super easy for you to get screened for colorectal cancer…for most people, it's as easy as pooping in a box.

If you are willing to poop in the box, click here, and I’ll send you an order form that you can take with you to your next doctor’s appointment.

Show Notes Transcript

If you are 45 or older, pay attention!  It’s time for you to be screened for colon and rectal cancer.  

Colon cancer is when abnormal cells in the colon or rectum divide uncontrollably, ultimately forming a cancerous or malignant tumor. (The colon and rectum are parts of the body’s digestive system, which takes up nutrients from food and water and stores solid waste until it passes out of the body.

Colorectal cancer is very common.  In fact, it’s the third most common type of cancer in both men (after prostate cancer and lung cancer) and women (after breast cancer and lung cancer). 

While it’s the 3rd most common cancer, it is the second deadliest behind ung cancer. 

An estimated 130,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year, and approximately 50,000 will die from it.

The major risk factors for colorectal cancer are a family history of the disease and older age, but several other factors have been associated with increased risk, including excessive alcohol use, obesity, being physically inactive, cigarette smoking.

I’ve made it super easy for you to get screened for colorectal cancer…for most people, it's as easy as pooping in a box.

If you are willing to poop in the box, click here, and I’ll send you an order form that you can take with you to your next doctor’s appointment.

speaker 0:   0:00
If you're over 45 pay attention. It's time for you to be screened for colorectal cancer. Listen closely because things have recently changed. Welcome to health made simple. You know, most people are overwhelmed, and they're confused by the endless amounts of information found on the Internet, especially when it comes to your health. And as a health care provider, I see it every single day. That's why we've created health made simple, a place where you can come to get clear, concise and accurate health information in just five minutes or less. So today we're talking about colorectal cancer, and that's when abnormal cells in the colon or rectum divide uncontrollably, ultimately forming cancerous or malignant tumors. The colon and rectum, or parts of the body's digestive system, which takes up nutrients from food and water and store solid waste until it passes out of the body. Most colorectal cancers begin as a polyp growth in the tissue that lines the inner surface of the colon or rectum. There are flat polyps, and there are raised polyps and polyps are really common in people over 50. Most polyps aren't cancer, however, a certain type of polish, known as an ad, Noma may have a higher risk of becoming a cancer. Colorectal cancer is very common. In fact, it's the third most common type of cancer in both men and women in men after prostate and lung cancer and in women after breast and lung cancer. And while it's the third most common cancer, it's the second deadliest behind lung cancer. In fact, an estimated 130,000 people in the U. S will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year, and approximately 50,000 will die because of it. Major risk factors for colorectal cancer are having a family history of the disease. So, like if your mom or dad, if your sisters or brothers have colon cancer, you're more likely to get colon cancer or if your odor. But there are also several other factors that have been associated with an increased risk. So, like if you drink excessive alcohol, where if you are a smoker, if you are obese or have a sedentary or inactive lifestyle, you're an increased risk. And if you've had also to colitis or crone's disease, which are part of inflammatory bowel disease, you also have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than people who don't have those conditions. The number of new colorectal cancer cases and deaths among people over 50. Good news. It's going down because screening tests are getting better and because the United States population as a whole does not smoke like we used to, however, and we're not sure why colorectal cancer is becoming more and more frequent in younger adults. There are several screening tests to help detect colorectal cancer early, when it may be more treatable. In fact, providers often have a saying is what is the best colorectal cancer screening test, and the answer is the one that gets done. There are some tests that detect ad no mus and polyps and can actually prevent the development of cancer because these tests, instead of letting things go haywire and run wild, these tests allow growths that might otherwise become cancer to be detected and removed. So colorectal cancer screening may actually be a form of cancer prevention, not just early detection. Who needs to be screened well, it used to be that routine screening started in age 50 and continued to age 75 But recently the American Cancer Society began recommending that routine screening because of the increased prevalence at a younger age that the routine screening begin at age 45. Now, after 75 the decision is based on patients, life expectancy, their health status, any other co morbid conditions and prior screening results. And once you hit 85 routine screening is not recommended. Today, let's review the two most common colorectal screening test. First, the colonoscopy with a colonoscopy. Ah, flexible tube with a light. A camera and a snip are passed through Uranus into the rectum and into the large intestine, also called the colon. Error is then pumped into the colon, and it expands the colon kind of like a balloon, so the doctor can see the lining of the colon clearly. And if the doctor visualize is any abnormal growths, he or she can then remove them. Right then and there. Colonoscopies Ken reduced deaths from colorectal cancer by up to 70%. And if your colonoscopy is a completely normal right now, the current recommendations are that you don't need another one for 10 years. The advantages of getting a colonoscopy are the fact that the doctor is directly visualizing the colon and any growths that might be present, and they can grab them while they're there. But colonoscopies do require an unpleasant prep. Prior to the test, there is a chance of perforating the bower puncturing, putting a hole in it with the tool. And most patients will want and need some form of sedation, so you'll need have a friend take you to and from that procedure. So choose your friends wisely. The other colorectal cancer screening test I want to talk to you about and it's been all over TV lately is the poop in the box kit called Cola Guard. So Cole, a guard, is now approved to screen adults 45 older an average risk of colorectal cancer. So this does not include people who have had a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or who have had inflammatory bowel disease, like crones or colitis, or who have hissed, who have had a history of polyps. And if you have any questions as to whether your average risk or high risk talk with your doctor about whether Cola guard is right for you, But with the cola guard test, you won't need to do the nasty prep. There's no risk of damage to the colon. You don't need any sedation, and you can collect it in the comfort of your own bathroom. A positive result does not necessarily mean that you have colorectal cancer. In fact, it means that the test detected either a blood or DNA dean a biomarker in the stool, Um, and it's associated with it with the colon cancer, or maybe a pre cancerous polyp. If you have a positive color guard, you'll then need to do a diagnostic colonoscopy and determine what's there. But if your result is negative, the American Cancer Society recommends screening in three years. It's time to get screened for colorectal cancer, and I've made it super easy for you in the show notes. There's a link, and if you're willing to poop in the box, click on the link. Enter your information and I'll send you an order form that you can take with you to your next doctor's appointment. Listen, I know that I went over five minutes, and I'm sorry, but here's the deal. Colorectal cancer, if caught early, has one of the lowest death rates, so if you're over 45 it's time to get screened